Tag Archive | "Haramat Masach"

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Curtain Up 2011: A Festival of Dance Premieres

Posted on 30 October 2011 by Deborah Friedes Galili


In Her Own Words by Rachel Erdos.  Photo by Yaniv Cohen.

Founded in 1989, Curtain Up (Haramat Masach in Hebrew) has become a centerpiece of Israel’s contemporary dance calendar.  In many ways, the core of this yearly platform has remained the same over the decades: up-and-coming choreographers who operate outside of the country’s major companies receive financial and artistic support to present new works on a series of mixed bills in Tel Aviv and Jerusalem.

Yet in its most recent editions, Curtain Up has added another layer: cultivating artistic directors who are themselves choreographers.  Last year, four alumni of the festival – Tamar Borer, Sahar Azimi, Ronit Ziv, and Renana Raz – were each charged with curating an evening.  This year, Borer, Azimi, and Ziv are returning as artistic directors, applying the lessons they learned in 2010 to Curtain Up 2011, which runs from November 3-12.

Curtain Up’s three programs will each be performed twice at the Suzanne Dellal Centre and once at the Jerusalem Theatre.  In cooperation with the Choreographers Association and Tarbut L’Yisrael, the works created for Curtain Up will also be performed in Israel’s northern and southern regions, enabling these younger choreographers to gain further exposure.

So just what is on the bill for Curtain Up this year?  Here is a video preview of the three programs:

Curtain 1

Artistic Director: Tamar Borer
Choreographers: Iris Erez, Maya Brinner, Maya Weinberg
Performances at the Suzanne Dellal Centre: November 3 and 12 at 21:00
Performances at the Jerusalem Theatre: November 10 at 20:30

Video: Shuttered by Iris Erez


Video: Forest by Maya Brinner


Video: Some Fish (swim up the river to die) by Maya Weinberg

Curtain 2

Artistic Director: Sahar Azimi
Choreographers: Doron Raz, Roy Assaf, Gili Navot, Noa Zuk
Performances at the Suzanne Dellal Centre: November 4 at 22:00 and November 10 at 21:00
Performances at the Jerusalem Theatre: November 8 at 20:30


Video: Valentia by Doron Raz


Video: 6 Years Later by Roy Assaf


Video: Subject to Change by Gili Navot


Video: Speaker by Noa Zuk

Curtain 3

Artistic Director: Ronit Ziv
Choreographers: Hillel Kogan, Rachel Erdos, Osnat Kelner
Performances at the Suzanne Dellal Centre: November 5 at 21:00 and November 11 at 22:00
Performances at the Jerusalem Theatre: November 9 at 20:30


Video: Obscene Gesture by Hillel Kogan


Video: In Her Own Words by Rachel Erdos


Video: The sad little, unappreciative, Pisces, Jesus man by Osnat Kelner

More Information

Tickets for Curtain Up performances are 60 NIS.  For tickets to Curtain Up at Suzanne Dellal, call 03-5105656.  For tickets to Curtain Up at the Jerusalem Theatre, call 02-5605755.

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Curtain Up 6: Niv Sheinfeld and Oren Laor Host Noa Shadur

Posted on 29 November 2009 by Deborah Friedes Galili

Big Mouth

Niv Sheinfeld and Oren Laor’s Big Mouth.  Photo by Gadi Dagon.

Dance In Israel: What is your relationship to Curtain Up?
Niv Sheinfeld: We made several pieces [for the festival].  I was doing work for the Batsheva Ensemble and the Kibbutz Dance Company in the beginning, but it was part of Curtain Up.  And then I did Co-Variance, Pig, and Jorona for Curtain Up, together with Oren.

Into the Night

Noa Shadur’s Into the Night.  Photo by Jewboy.

DII: What drew you to invite Noa Shadur to be the choreographer to share the bill with you?
Oren Laor:  I suggested Noa’s name, and Niv immediately said “Yes, that’s a good idea,” because we saw Noa’s work in the past, and among many Israeli independent choreographers, Noa’s sources are the ones that we feel are the best.  She looks at humans; we saw it’s never just strictly movement.  She’s an explorer, like we like.

Into the Night

Noa Shadur’s Into the Night.  Photo by Jewboy.

NS: I think [it was] also the fact that we had a good dialogue with her.  We started seeing her work and talking to her and checking things out, and we found that the language of the dialogue was fluent, and it gave us a good base.

Big Mouth

Niv Sheinfeld and Oren Laor’s Big Mouth. Photo by Gadi Dagon.

DII: Can you tell me a bit about how your new work Big Mouth started?
NS: The beginning was not from an idea; it was from working with Keren [Levi], because Keren is a good friend of mine for more than 25 years.  We went to high school together, and I got to know the dance world from her.  She was talking about coming to Israel; we said maybe we’ll make a solo for you.  We started by joking about it.  And then we invited her to get into the studio for two weeks in Tel Aviv, and interesting things came up for us.  Then we went for Amsterdam for the second period of work.

Big Mouth

Niv Sheinfeld and Oren Laor’s Big Mouth. Photo by Gadi Dagon.

NS: We were touring sometimes in this period, and we weren’t in Israel a lot, and somehow I think it affected this work. [Also] the fact that Keren left Israel, it made the piece somehow with reference to the Israeli culture.  It’s only a reference.  It’s from a very personal point of view, from our connection, this trio.  This solo became a trio; of course we found ourselves drawn in.

* * *

For listings of Curtain Up performances, please visit the Dance In Israel Calendars page.

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Curtain Up 5: Noa Dar Hosts Maya Brinner and Irad Mazliah

Posted on 27 November 2009 by Deborah Friedes Galili

Us

Noa Dar’s Us.  Photo by Tamar Lamm.

Dance In Israel: What is your relationship to Curtain Up?
Noa Dar: I choreographed for Curtain Up from 1996-2000, 5 years in a row.  And then I was a guest artist in 2001 and again in 2004 . . . It was very important thing for me, this Curtain Up.  It really was my school or my initiation program for my choreography, so I found this project very important.  And I think it’s very that good this time the choreographers have a chance to express their own artistic choices and also to guide young choreographers.  I’m excited about this opening of the establishment to the ideas of independent choreographers.  This is important.

The Red Line

Maya Brinner’s Red Ladies.  Photo by Tamar Lamm.

DII: What drew you to invite Maya Brinner and Irad Mazliah?
ND: These are dancers of mine.  Maya is dancing with me since 2000, already nine years.  And Irad is dancing with me for the last three years.  I found both of them to be very creative, very interesting in their research.  Both are also involved in other mediums of art; Irad came from visual art and Maya from film.  We had some mutual understanding, because for years we are working together.  I’m very happy to give them this opportunity.

Irad Mazliah

Irad Mazliah’s Unter den linden.  Photo by Tamar Lamm.

DII: Are there any links between the three works in Curtain 5?
ND: We had a lot of mutual talks and plans and trying to research what we have in common in order to build not a program of three different dances but to have an evening which has as many connections of possible . . . the three of us [are] looking at differences versus conformity, and stillness or stuck positions versus mobility and change.  And each one deals completely differently [with these ideas].  So there are different tones on a common basis in these three pieces.

The Red Line

Maya Brinner’s Red Ladies  Photo by Tamar Lamm.

ND: Maya is working with three female dancers who are [like] workers in a factory.  They’re all the same, and in this sameness they’re looking for their individuality and the way they can be unique in this competitive world.

Unter den linden

Irad Mazliah’s Unter den linden.  Photo by Tamar Lamm.

ND: Irad is coming from a different place.  He took three people who are very different, but he put all three of them in one world, with very distinct rules of its own.

Us

Noa Dar’s Us.  Photo by Tamar Lamm.

ND: My work is again three dancers that deals more with the Israeli common experiences that create the uniformity of the way of thinking, the way of acting, and the negative attitude towards difference.  I came [to this work] with very strong experiences that I’m having in the last few years as a mother and also as a citizen.

* * *

For listings of Curtain Up performances, please visit the Dance In Israel Calendars page.

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Curtain Up 4: Tel Aviv Dance Company & Yaara Dolev Host Michael Miler

Posted on 26 November 2009 by Deborah Friedes Galili

Blossom

Yaara Dolev’s Blossom.  Photo by Gadi Dagon.

Dance In Israel: Can you tell me about the relationship you and Amit Goldenberg have had with Curtain Up?
Yaara Dolev: The first work we did with Haramat Masach [Curtain Up] was a collaboration between us and plastic artists in 2001.  It was in the space between the theater and the Batsheva offices.  The whole place was covered with these mobile statues and we danced with [them], and it was a very nice project.  In 2002, we did another piece for Haramat Masach.  It was a very political piece; the name of it was Ivrim, about fascism . . . And in 2003, we did a piece called Machine.  It was a whole evening.   And that’s it.  That was when we decided that we want to create outside of this festival, to be more independent when we create.

Blossom

Yaara Dolev’s Blossom.  Photo by Gadi Dagon.

YD: This 20 year [anniversary of] Haramat Masach is a great opportunity to come back to this and to do it in an independent way.  It’s really unique and wonderful that they gave this option for the six creators to really do [the festival] without interference, without questioning, just to give this freedom to create.

Number 6

Michael Miler’s Number 6.  Photo by Gadi Dagon.

DII: What drew you to select Michael Miler to join you on the bill?
YD: Of course when we knew that had to select someone, we tried to see as much as possible . . . I think it’s a good collaboration because there’s something about his creation that is more [about] the pure, clean movement in space, and less [about] theater.  And [there’s] something about it that we believe in . . .

Number 6

Michael Miler’s Number 6.  Photo by Gadi Dagon.

YD: I think Michael is very talented.  I think he’s very interesting.  He’s coming from math; in university, he studied engineering and mathematics.  You can see it in his compositions, and it’s very interesting for me.  I think it’s very clear what he wants, and you can see he’s very mature about his creation.

Blossom

Yaara Dolev’s Blossom.  Photo by Gadi Dagon.

DII: Can you tell me a little bit about the work that you’re premiering, Blossom?  Where did it come from?
YD: Actually, it started by chance.  I took a DVD from the Third Ear [a DVD store in Tel Aviv], and it was a Sean Penn movie, Into the Wild.  It’s a wonderful film, and when I finished the film, immediately I knew what I want to do in this work.  And what we’re doing now is pretty much the same vision that I had when I finished [seeing] this movie . . . it was the first pulse for me for the creation.  Also, I thought because it’s the first creation I [am doing] without Amit, it’s really my blossom.

Blossom

Yaara Dolev’s Blossom.  Photo by Gadi Dagon.

YD: I was really with myself in this creation.  I feel like I could really put my dream on the dancers onstage.  There’s my truth there, so it feels good.

* * *

For listings of Curtain Up performances, please visit the Dance In Israel Calendars page.

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Curtain Up 3: Yasmeen Godder Hosts Iris Erez

Posted on 25 November 2009 by Deborah Friedes Galili

LOVE FIRE

Yasmeen Godder’s LOVE FIRE. Photo by Tamar Lamm.

Dance In Israel: What is your relationship to Curtain Up?
Yasmeen Godder: I’ve presented many times, from 1999-2004 consecutively.  I’ve experienced the festival many times, and it has had a great impact on my career in a sense that it allowed me to present a work for those six years every year . . . I would premiere something in the winter, and in the summer I would start working again towards the new creation in the winter, so it created a cycle for me that made a lot of sense during the years that I did it.

Namibia

Iris Erez’s Numbia.  Photo by Itay Merom.

DII: What made you choose to host Iris Erez?
YG: When we first had the meeting at the Ministry of Culture, the concept was to invite people whose work has evolved from working with us or from growing within our work.  And so when I thought of who has done that, obviously Iris was a very clear choice.

Namibia

Iris Erez’s Numbia.  Photo by Itay Merom.

DII: Do you see strong links between your work and Iris’s work?
YG: Given that Iris has worked with me for many years, I think that her method of generating materials is influenced by the methodology which I have developed over the years and therefore [it] perhaps has similar roots, but ultimately each of our works is developed through the very personalized prism of our worlds both thematically and in the different ways of constructing them . . .

LOVE FIRE

Yasmeen Godder’s LOVE FIRE. Photo by Tamar Lamm.

DII: Can you tell me a little bit about where LOVE FIRE came from?
YG: I was commissioned to make a work using three waltz pieces in October of last year.  At first I found myself rejecting the idea of accepting this commission; I didn’t immediately find an interest in it.  And then I decided that because it presents a challenge for me, because the music that was sent to me was not necessarily music that I knew what I wanted to do with [it], that this was interesting and this was an opportunity to do something differently.

LOVE FIRE

Yasmeen Godder’s LOVE FIRE.   Photo by Tamar Lamm.

YG: I was fascinated by this idea that I received this CD with classical waltzes to my Jaffa mailbox.  I tried to keep this tension of this music that doesn’t relate to here, and how do we approach it; how can we relate to it.  And that was the beginning.

LOVE FIRE

Yasmeen Godder’s LOVE FIRE.   Photo by Tamar Lamm.

YG: Then I collaborated with Yochai Matos, the visual artist.  For many years he approached me about doing [something], and we’ve talked with each other about our work.  Ultimately, we decided that what would be interesting would be that he would create a response – not a collaboration with me, but rather a response to my work.  So that’s what’s happening on my stage . . . It’s a performative installation-based response, because he’s actually a visual artist; he’s not a performance artist, but there’s an aspect of what he does that can be seen as performance.

* * *

For listings of Curtain Up performances, please visit the Dance In Israel Calendars page.

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